Antonis Kotsonas

Assistant Professor of Mediterranean History and Archaeology

Antonis Kotsonas is Assistant Professor of Mediterranean History and Archaeology at the Institute for the Study of the Ancient World. He holds a Ph.D. from the University of Edinburgh, an M.Phil. from the University of Cambridge, and a B.A. from the University of Crete.

His research focuses on the material culture and socio-economic history of Greece and the Mediterranean in the Early Iron Age and the Archaic period, though his research interests extend from the Late Bronze Age to the Roman period. He has conducted fieldwork and finds research on Crete, and in the Cyclades, Euboea, Macedonia and Latium; and comparative studies across the Aegean, and from Italy to Cyprus. His publications engage problems in state formation, trade and interaction, identity and commensality, memory, and the history of Greek and Mediterranean archaeology. He is the author of The Archaeology of Tomb A1K1 of Orthi Petra in Eleutherna (Athens 2008); co-author of Methone Pierias I: Inscriptions, Graffiti and Trademarks on Geometric and Archaic Pottery from the ‘Ypogeio’ of Methone Pierias in Macedonia (Thessaloniki 2012); the editor of Understanding Standardization and Variation in Mediterranean Ceramics: Mid 2nd to Late 1st Millennium BC (Leuven 2014); and co-editor of a Wiley Blackwell Companion to the Archaeology of Early Greece and the Mediterranean (Forthcoming). Also, he is Area Editor for the Wiley Encyclopedia of Ancient History.

Prior to joining NYU, Antonis Kotsonas was Assistant Professor at the University of Cincinnati, and Lecturer at the University of Edinburgh, the University of Amsterdam, the University of Crete, and King’s College London. He also served as Curator at the Allard Pierson Museum Amsterdam. Kotsonas has held a Loeb Classical Library Foundation Fellowship (2017-2018), he has received the Rising Star Award from the College of Arts and Sciences of the University of Cincinnati (2018), and he is the Visiting Professor of the Australian Archaeological Institute at Athens, which involves lecturing across Australia in summer 2018.