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02/28/2024 05:30 PM ISAW Lecture Hall
Conceptual rendering of an ancient city, viewed from above, with flood waters covering fields and the area between buildings.

The Politics of Flood and Flow in Early Dynastic Lagash:

New Evidence for the Environmental Collapse of a Mesopotamian City

Reed Goodman

This lecture will take place in person at ISAW. Registration is required; click through for the registration link. New research in southern Iraq at the ancient city of Lagash, modern Tell al-Hiba, indicates that systemic flooding contributed to the site's demise at the end of Sumer's Early Dynastic period, circa 2,350 BCE. We know from contemporary sources that the "Lagash-Umma Border Conflict," comprising the earliest record in both text and image of organized violence, involved a territorial dispute between the rival city-states of Lagash and Umma over water in the Gu'edena, the ecologically rich "edge" of the Lower Mesopotamian floodplain.
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03/12/2024 05:30 PM Online
Seated statue of Buddha with some damage, especially to the hands

Expanding the Ancient World Workshop

How to Look at Ancient Art

Organized by the Institute for the Study of the Ancient World

This workshop will take place online. Registration is required; click through for the registration link. Zoom information will be provided via confirmation email to registered participants. Expanding the Ancient World is a series of professional development workshops and online resources for teachers.
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04/02/2024 05:30 PM Online
Photo of circular stone stamp seal next to clay impression; the design features stylized hunters and goats.

Expanding the Ancient World Workshop

Globalization in the Ancient World

Organized by the Institute for the Study of the Ancient World

This workshop will take place online. Registration is required; click through for the registration link. Zoom information will be provided via confirmation email to registered participants. Expanding the Ancient World is a series of professional development workshops and online resources for teachers. We tend to think of globalization as a modern phenomenon, where far-flung places impact one other through exchange of ideas, resources, commodities, technologies, and human mobility. How can we engage with the evidence regarding the early history of interconnectedness in the world?
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04/08/2024 05:30 PM ISAW Lecture Hall
Photo of archaeological site on top of hill in a mountainous area, taken from a higher vantage point

Rostovtzeff Lecture Series: The End in Sight? Archaeological Science, Globalisation and Unsustainability

Lecture 1: Great Zimbabwe: Archaeological Science, Globalisation and Humans with a Different History

Shadreck Chirikure

This lecture -- the first in a four-part series -- will take place in person at ISAW. Registration is required; click through for the registration link. Great Zimbabwe, located deep in south-eastern Zimbabwe in southern Africa, is globally prominent for various reasons, some graceful but others more disgraceful. It is an impressive architectural ensemble of multi-building settlements that were listed on the UNESCO World Heritage List in 1986.
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04/10/2024 05:30 PM ISAW Lecture Hall
Headshot of speaker

Rostovtzeff Lecture Series: The End in Sight? Archaeological Science, Globalisation and Unsustainability

Lecture 2: Archaeological Science and Internal African Globalisation

Shadreck Chirikure

This lecture -- the second in a four-part series -- will take place in person at ISAW. Registration is required; click through for the registration link. The African continent is a vast continent, characterised by different resource gradients. However, Africa suffered greatly from extractive activities of other continents since time immemorial.
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04/15/2024 05:30 PM ISAW Lecture Hall
Several spread out gold coins

Rostovtzeff Lecture Series: The End in Sight? Archaeological Science, Globalisation and Unsustainability

Lecture 3: Archaeological Science, Globalisation and the Atlantic-Indian Ocean System – Oranjemund Shipwreck

Shadreck Chirikure

This lecture -- the third in a four-part series -- will take place in person at ISAW. Registration is required; click through for the registration link. In 2008, routine sand dredging for diamond mining exposed a Portuguese ship resting on the Atlantic ocean floor since sinking in 1533 on its way to India. The remnants of the Bom Jesus as the ship was known were recovered from Oranjemund, a small town near the Orange River Delta in Namibia.
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04/17/2024 05:30 PM ISAW Lecture Hall
Jade teapot with an opened lid

Rostovtzeff Lecture Series: The End in Sight? Archaeological Science, Globalisation and Unsustainability

Lecture IV: Homo faber and Homo dolor: Archaeological Science, Globalisation and (Un)sustainability

Shadreck Chirikure

This lecture -- the fourth in a four-part series -- will take place in person at ISAW. Registration is required; click through for the registration link. Humans thrive on materials to fulfil daily needs and wants. They develop relationships of interdependence with things and exchange them to create social relationships and to fulfil obligations. Peering into the deep past, starting millions of years ago, humans and their ancestors worked materials such as stone to make tools, and with time produced things for beautification, and to fulfil symbolic functions.
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05/01/2024 05:30 PM ISAW Lecture Hall
Photo of the Dakhla Oasis showing the dramatic distinction between the grassy oasis and the sands and escarpment of the surrounding desert

Expanding the Ancient World Workshop

Ancient Environmental History: How Do You Build a Roman City in the Middle of Egypt’s Western Desert?

Organized by the Institute for the Study of the Ancient World

This workshop will take place in person at ISAW. Registration is required; click through for the registration link. Expanding the Ancient World is a series of professional development workshops and online resources for teachers. Ancient Trimithis was one of many medium-sized cities in the Roman Empire; but unlike most, it was located right in the middle of Egypt’s inhospitable Western Desert, hundreds of kilometers from the Nile Valley, one of the driest places on earth. In this workshop we will explore how people adapted to and thrived in this harsh and changing environment by studying the results from NYU’s Amheida Excavations in Egypt’s Dakhla Oasis.
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