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ISAW News Blog

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Applications Open for Visiting Research Scholars Program (2011)

by Administrator Jan 07, 2011

ISAW is now accepting applications for its revised Visiting Research Scholars program. Positions are now available for two-year postdoctoral fellows, one-year visiting research scholars (full or partial funding) and postdoctoral scholars with their own external funding.

Full information about the program, and links to the online applications, are available on the ISAW Visiting Scholars Program page.

The Artemis Liturgical Papyrus

by Administrator Jan 07, 2011

Tuesday, October 5 at 6:00pm: Visiting Research Scholar Lecture

The Artemis Liturgical Papyrus
Presented by Jacco Dieleman

The Institute for the Study of the Ancient World
New York University
Lecture Hall
15 East 84th Street
New York, NY 10028
isaw@nyu.edu
www.nyu.edu/isaw
free and open to the public

reception to follow

This presentation will offer a preliminary survey of an unpublished Egyptian manuscript, dating to the late Ptolemaic or early Roman period, that preserves a unique collection of liturgical texts for Osirian rituals adapted and inscribed for the burial of a woman named Artemis, daughter of Herais. I term the manuscript 'The Artemis Liturgical Papyrus' after its owner. To date, eight columns have been identified in the Louvre and the Kunsthistorisches Museum in Vienna. Apart from the liturgical texts themselves, the manuscript is of particular interest for its inclusion of rubrics in Demotic serving as instructions for use to the incantations, which are otherwise all written in Classical Egyptian in the hieratic script. The Greek names of the deceased and her mother are also consistently written with Demotic characters. Highlights of the manuscript are a version of the Ritual of Bringing Sokar out of the Shrine, parallels with the Apopis Book, a curious bark ritual, and instructions for rotating the mummy. The sequence of rituals appears to follow the schema of rituals performed at the Sokar Festival as depicted in the memorial temple of King Ramesses III at Medinet Habu. Apart from the manuscript's obvious significance for the study of Egyptian ritual, the presence of Greek personal names in an environment that is textually and ritually fully Egyptian in nature raises important questions about the processes and mechanisms of acculturation and religious adaptation in Ptolemaic and early Roman Egypt.

Applications Open for Doctoral Program 2011-2012

by Administrator Jan 07, 2011

ISAW is now accepting applications for entrance in Fall 2011 to its Doctoral Program in the Ancient World. Complete information about the program and the application process, including a link to the on-line application system, may be found on the ISAW Graduate Program page. The recommended due date for applications is December 18, 2010.

New Research Seminars for Spring 2011

by Administrator Jan 07, 2011

ISAW has announced the following research seminars for Fall 2010:

  • Chronology, Calendars, and Astronomy (Prof. Alexander Jones)
  • Shaping the Divine in the Ancient Near East (Prof. Beate Pongratz-Leisten)
  • Archaeology of Consumption in the Ancient Near East (Prof. Caroline Sauvage)
  • Territorial Fortifications in the Old World (Prof. Soeren Stark)

Participation in ISAW research seminars requires the permission of the instructor(s). Please visit the ISAW 2010/2011 courses page for more information.

 

Amheida: Excavating a City in the Dakhla Oasis of Egypt

by Administrator Jan 07, 2011

A public lecture, sponsored by ISAW and the Archaeological Institute of America:

Amheida: Excavating a City in the Dakhla Oasis of Egypt
presented by Roger Bagnall, ISAW Director

6:30 pm, Thursday, September 30, 2010
*reception to follow

ISAW Lecture Hall
15 East 84th Street
New York, NY 10028
www.nyu.edu/isaw

Amheida is a large archaeological site on the western edge of the Dakhla Oasis in Egypt, with finds ranging from the Old Kingdom to the fourth century C.E. Exploration of the site began in 2001, with excavation starting in 2004 (photos). Near the center of the town is the 15-room house of Serenus, who was part of the city council in the middle of the fourth century. Four of the rooms have surviving wall-paintings, including a central reception room with scenes from classical mythology. To the north of the house was a three-room school; underneath all of this were the remains of a Roman bath. Areas excavated to date also include the remains of the Temple of Thoth, and an early Roman pyramid has been conserved.

Job Opportunity: Programmer for Digital Papyrology Project

by Administrator Jan 07, 2011

ISAW participates in a broad collaboration called Integrating Digital Papyrology. The work team is expanding and the following immediate job opportunity has been announced:

New York University
Programmer/Analyst

New York University’s Division of the Libraries seeks a Programmer/Analyst to work on the “Papyrological Navigator” (http://papyri.info) and associated systems. Papyri.info is a web-based research portal that provides scholars worldwide with the ability to search, browse and collaboratively edit texts, transcriptions, images and metadata relating to ancient texts on papyri, pottery fragments and other material. The incumbent will work closely with the Project Coordinator and with scholars involved in the project at NYU’s Institute for the Study of the Ancient World, Duke University, the University of Kentucky, King's College London and the University of Heidelberg, as well as with NYU Digital Library Technology staff.

The incumbent’s initial responsibilities will include: close collaboration with project team members to enhance and extend a robust production environment at NYU for the ongoing ingest and processing of new and updated text transcriptions, metadata and digital images; performing both analysis and programming of any required changes or enhancements to current PN applications.

Candidates should have the following skills:

  • Bachelor’s degree in computer or information science and 3 years of relevant experience or equivalent combination
  • Must include experience developing web applications using Java
  • Demonstrated knowledge of Java, Javascript, Tomcat, Saxon, Lucene, Apache, SQL, XML, XSLT
  • Experience with metadata standards (e.g. TEI, EpiDoc)
  • Experience working in Unix/Linux environments
  • Preferred: Experience with Apache Solr, RDF triple stores (e.g. Mulgara), Clojure
  • Preferred: Experience designing, building, and deploying distributed systems
  • Preferred: Experience working with non-Roman Unicode-based textual data (esp. Greek)
  • Excellent communication and analytical skills

Applicants should submit resume and cover letter, which reflects how applicant’s education and experience match the job requirements.

NYU offers a competitive salary and superior benefit package, which includes tuition benefits for self and eligible family members, generous vacation, medical, dental, and retirement plans. For more information about working at NYU visit our website at: www.nyucareers.com.

To apply:

To apply for this position online, visit
http://www.nyucareers.com/applicants/Central?quickFind=52507

NYU is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer.

Fall 2010 Events at ISAW

by Administrator Jan 07, 2011

Unless otherwise indicated, all events are held at:

The Institute for the Study of the Ancient World
15 East 84th St.
New York, NY  10028

All events are free and open to the public.

For complete event information, please visit:http://www.nyu.edu/isaw/events.htm

Thursday, September 30 at 6:30 p.m.

Archaeological Institute of America Lecture
Amheida, Excavating a City in the Dakhla Oasis of Egypt
Presented by Roger Bagnall, Director, ISAW
*reception to follow

Saturday, October 2 at 10:30 a.m.
Lod Mosaic Roundtable Discussion
Sponsored by The Metropolitan Museum of Art, Israeli Antiquities Authority, and ISAW
Participants: Miriam Avissar, IAA; Jacques Neguer, IAA; Sarah E. Cox, Independent Scholar;
Glen Bowersock, IAS, Christopher Lightfoot, MMA
*Seating is limited, please RSVP to isaw@nyu.edu

Tuesday, October 5 at 6:00 p.m.
Visiting Research Scholar Lecture Series
The Artemis Liturgical Papyrus
Presented by Jacco Dieleman
*reception to follow

Tuesday, October 19 at 6:00 p.m.
Visiting Research Scholar Lecture Series
The Astronomical Book of Enoch - Jewish Apocalypticism and the History of Science
Presented by Jonathan Ben-Dov
*reception to follow

Tuesday, November 2 at 6:00 p.m.
Visiting Research Scholar Lecture Series
Babylonian Mathematical Astronomy - Science in Action
Presented by Mathieu Ossendrijver
*reception to follow

Thursday, November 4 at 6:00 p.m.
Annual Leon Levy Lecture
The Cultural Dynamism of Astral Science in the Hellenistic Age
Presented by Francesca Rochberg, University of California, Berkeley
*reception to follow
Seating is limited, please RSVP to isaw@nyu.edu

Friday and Saturday, November 12-13, 8:30 a.m.
A Mathematician's Journeys: Otto Neugebauer between history and practice of the exact sciences
Friday Location: Courant Institute, NYU
Saturday Location: ISAW
Seating is limited, plesae RSVP to isaw@nyu.edu

Tuesday, November 16 at 6:00 p.m.
Visiting Research Scholar Lecture Series
Religions in Contact: The Mesopotamian Goddess Nanaya at the Crossroads
Presented by Joan Westenholz
*reception to follow

Tuesday, November 30 at 6:00 p.m.
Visiting Research Scholar Lecture Series
Late Roman Taxation: The East/West Divide
Presented by Gilles Bransbourg
*reception to follow

Wednesday, December 1 at 6:00 p.m.
ISAW/American Turkish Society Lecture
Presented by Felix Pirson, Director, DAI - Istanbul
*reception to follow
Seating is limited, please RSVP to isaw@nyu.edu

Tuesday, December 14 at 6:00 p.m.
Visiting Research Scholar Lecture Series
Death in the province: mortuary practices and Roman imperialism in Syria and Lebanon
Presented by Lidewijde de Jong
*reception to follow

Position Announcement: Professor of Ancient Western Asian Archaeology and History

by Administrator Jan 07, 2011

The Institute for the Study of the Ancient World, New York University, seeks to make an appointment (rank open) in the area of Late Bronze Age and Early Iron Age Western Asian (Anatolia, Levant) Archaeology and History. The successful candidate will have demonstrated distinction in a broad range of interests across the Eastern Mediterranean world and a commitment to the study of cultural connections across geographical and chronological lines. We seek individuals who will be stimulated by working closely with colleagues in other disciplines, approaches, periods, or geographical areas and who are committed to helping develop the intellectual life of such a community. Applicants with a history of interdisciplinary exchange are particularly welcome. The Institute’s graduate program emphasizes individual supervision and research seminars. The faculty is involved in choosing a group of visiting researchers each year.

Applications (letter, curriculum vitae, and list of referees) should be made through the NYU online system at www.nyuopsearch.com/applicants/Central?quickFind=50576. Review of candidates will begin on November 1st, 2010. For questions, please email Ms. Kathryn Lawson at kathryn.lawson@nyu.edu. New York University is an equal opportunity/affirmative action employer.

Position Announcement: Professor of Near Eastern Languages and Cultures (Aramaic, Syriac, Arabic)

by Administrator Jan 07, 2011

The Institute for the Study of the Ancient World, New York University, seeks to make an appointment (tenured or tenure-track, rank open) of a wide-ranging scholar in the languages, literatures, and cultures of the Near East in the Roman, Late Antique, and early Islamic periods. The principal areas of interest should be in the Semitic languages (Aramaic, Syriac, and Arabic, in particular) rather than in Greek, but specialization is less important than broad interests and connections with neighboring regions and cultures. We seek individuals of scholarly distinction whose work will benefit from freedom from departmental structures and who will be stimulated by working closely with colleagues in other disciplines, approaches, periods, or geographical areas and who are committed to helping develop the intellectual life of such a community. Applicants with a history of interdisciplinary exchange are particularly welcome. The Institute’s graduate program emphasizes individual supervision and research seminars. The faculty is involved in choosing a group of visiting researchers each year.

Applications (letter, curriculum vitae, and list of referees) should be made through the NYU online system at www.nyuopsearch.com/applicants/Central?quickFind=50564. Review of candidates will begin on November 1, 2010. For questions, please email Ms. Kathryn Lawson at kathryn.lawson@nyu.edu. New York University is an equal opportunity/affirmative action employer.

A Review of The Lost World of Old Europe

by Administrator Jan 07, 2011

Neal Acherson in the London Review of Books [Vol. 32 No. 15 · 5 August 2010]writes about The Lost World of Old Europe, an exhibition originating at ISAWand which is just ending its run at the Ashmolean Museum:

Poor Europa! The competition to give her an ancestry has been raging for generations. Now the Ashmolean Museum in Oxford – the new, gorgeously refashioned Ashmolean, which reopened last November with 39 new galleries – has joined in.[*] The Lost World of Old Europe reveals a brilliant, imaginative, precocious culture that arose in south-eastern Europe in the late Neolithic period, the Copper Age, but after flourishing for several thousand years, failed and was forgotten...

...The Oxford exhibition is small, but utterly spectacular. Its objects – the figurines, the painted ceramics – are irresistible. Its message adds a new page to the conventional history of ‘civilisation’. Some 7000 years ago, in south-eastern Europe around the lower Danube, groups of farmers with loosely similar ways of life settled in an area reaching from modern Bulgaria and Romania across into Ukraine. In the transitional period between the Neolithic and the Bronze Age, they flourished and multiplied. They evolved an elaborately beautiful material culture of painted pottery, goldwork and beads. They modelled and treasured clay figurines of women – and a few men. They mined copper and gold, and imported fashionable seashells from the distant Aegean. They seem to have lived in peace and equality...

Read the rest of the story!

From October 2010 – January 2011, the exhibition will be in the Stathatos Mansion, Museum of Cycladic Art, Athens

Dawn Gross Appointed to Library Faculty

by Administrator Jan 07, 2011

I am pleased to announce that Dawn Gross has been appointed Assistant Head of the Library of the Institute for the Study of the Ancient World, effective July 21, 2010. Dawn has been leading the cataloging project at ISAW since 2007 and was previously an adjunct cataloger in Technical Services. She has her B.A. from NYU (1987) and received her MSLIS from the Palmer School in 2006.

You can reach her by email and by telephone at: (212) 992-7811.

Please join me in congratulating Dawn on her promotion to the Libraries faculty.

Chuck Jones
Head Librarian, ISAW

New Research Seminars

by Administrator Jan 07, 2011

ISAW has announced the following research seminars for Fall 2010:

  • Ancient Texts and Documents: Editing a Didactic Manuscript from Roman Egypt (Profs. Roger Bagnall and Alexander Jones)
  • Art, Archaeology and Material Culture in Central Asia: Central Asia and the Mediterranean from the 6th c. BC to the 8th c. AD (Prof. Soeren Stark)
  • Art, Archaeology and Material Culture in East Asia: History, Memory and Media in China (Prof. Lillian Tseng)


Participation in ISAW research seminars requires the permission of the instructor(s). Please visit the ISAW courses page for more information.

New Faculty: Lillian Tseng

by Administrator Jan 07, 2011

The Institute for the Study of the Ancient World at New York University is pleased to announce the appointment of Lillian Tseng as Associate Professor of East Asian Art and Archaeology.

Prior to joining ISAW in 2010, she served as Associate Professor in the Department of the History of Art at Yale University. She received her B.A. and M.A. in History from National Taiwan University (1988, 1992), and her Ph.D. in History of Art and Architecture from Harvard University (2001). She has been awarded post-doctoral fellowships from the Getty Foundation, Yale University, and the Chiang Ching-kuo Foundation for International Scholarly Exchange.

Professor Tseng is interested in exploring the interface of art history and cultural history. She is the author of Picturing Heaven in Early China (Harvard University Press, 2011). She has also published a number of articles concerned with diverse cultural issues in Chinese art, such as history and memory, visual replication and political persuasion, pictorial representation and historical writing, and the interchangeability of the self and the other. She is currently at work on two book projects: one investigates the reception of antiquity and its impact on visual production in eighteenth-century China, while the other examines frontiers and visual imaginations in Han China. She is also editing a scholarly volume entitled Representing Things: Visuality and Materiality in East Asia.

Professor Tseng will begin teaching seminars at ISAW in the fall. Please join us in welcoming her to our community

Roger Bagnall, Director

New Faculty: Sören Stark

by Administrator Jan 07, 2011

The Institute for the Study of the Ancient World at New York University is pleased to announce the appointment of Sören Stark as Assistant Professor of Central Asian Art and Archaeology.

Professor Stark studied Oriental Archaeology and Art History, Ancient History, and European Art History at Martin-Luther-Universität Halle-Wittenberg. He received his doctorate in 2005 with a study on the archaeology and history of the pre-Muslim Turks in Central and Inner Asia, which was published in 2008 asDie Alttürkenzeit in Mittel- und Zentralasien. Archaeologische und historische Studien (Nomaden und Sesshafte 6).

From 2005 to 2008 he led archaeological surveys and excavations in Northern Tajikistan. Before joining the faculty of ISAW he was a Junior Fellow at theExcellence Cluster TOPOI and teaching at the Freie Universität in Berlin.

His research ranges chronologically from the Iron Age up to the pre-Mongol Middle Ages and deals with various aspects of archaeology, art history, and history in Central and Inner Asia as well as in neighboring cultural areas. His main focus lies on the political and cultural interrelations between pastoral nomads in these areas and their sedentary neighbors. Currently, he is preparing a book on territorial fortifications in Western Central Asia. He is also co-editor of a Handbook of Central Asian Archaeology and Art which is presently under preparation at Oxford University Press.

Professor Stark will begin teaching seminars at ISAW in the fall. Please join us in welcoming him to our community.

Roger Bagall, Director

Grant Award from the National Endowment for the Humanities

by Administrator Jan 07, 2011

The Institute for the Study of the Ancient World is pleased to announce an award for the National Endowment for the Humanities. Through the Humanities Collections and Reference Resources program of the Division of Preservation and Access, NEH has granted New York University $298,457 in outright grant funds to support an additional three years of funding for the development of Pleiades, our online collaborative gazetteer of the Greek and Roman world (and beyond).

ISAW Newsletter Published

by Administrator Jan 07, 2011

Issue 2 of the ISAW Newsletter (December 2009) has been published. A PDF copy has been posted to the ISAW website.

Exhibition: Nubia - Ancient Kingdoms of Africa

ISAW announces its next exhibition, March 11 - June 12, 2011.
by Tom Elliott Feb 07, 2011
Exhibition: Nubia - Ancient Kingdoms of Africa

Hathor-headed crystal pendant; photo © 2011 Museum of Fine Arts, Boston

ISAW's next exhibition, "Nubia: Ancient Kingdoms of Africa," will be on display at 15 East 84th Street in New York City from March 11 - June 12, 2011. More information is available on the Nubia: Ancient Kingdoms of Africa website.

Nubia: Ancient Kingdoms of Africa Exhibition Opens

ISAW's latest exhibition, Nubia: Ancient Kingdoms of Africa, opens today.
by Tom Elliott May 20, 2011

ISAW's latest exhibition, Nubia: Ancient Kingdoms of Africa, opens today. A much-expanded companion website is now also available at http://www.nyu.edu/isaw/exhibitions/nubia/.

Jinyu Liu Receives Mellon Foundation Fellowship

Jinyu Liu, associate professor of classical studies at DePauw University, and a 2007-2008 Visitng Research Scholar at ISAW, is one of the recipients of a New Directions Fellowship from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation.
by Tom Elliott May 20, 2011

Jinyu Liu, associate professor of classical studies at DePauw University, and a 2007-2008 Visiting Research Scholar at ISAW, is one of the recipients of a New Directions Fellowship from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation.

The award will fund innovative cross-cultural research on the impact of Greek and Roman classical works on the intellectual history of China. Based on a systematic investigation of the dissemination and reception of Graceo-Roman classics in late imperial and modern China, this project explores the roles Graeco-Roman antiquity played in the Chinese discourses on the value of classical traditions, both Chinese and non-Chinese, and strategies of constructing and appropriating the West in the context of China’s tormenting journey towards the formation of its modern culture.

This project represents a research direction that is distinctive from Jinyu Liu’s past scholarship, which focused on Latin inscriptions and Roman socio-economic history. The Fellowship will allow her to receive extra disciplinary training in languages, Modern Chinese History, Translation Theory, and Postcolonialism, and enable her to redirect her scholarly career into an area that allows for greater interdisciplinary inquiry. In 2011-2012, she will be based in Beijing as a visiting professor at Peking University. In 2012-2013, she will be resident in New York and taking various courses at Columbia University.

ISAW Spring 2011 Newsletter Released

by Tom Elliott May 20, 2011

The Spring 2011 ISAW Newsletter is now available as a PDF file from the Newsletter page on the ISAW website.

It includes the following sections:

  • Letter from the Director
  • ISAW Community News
    • Recent Publications
    • Awards
  • Research and Teaching
    • Faculty and Scholars
    • Libraries
    • Digital Programs
  • Spring Exhibitions & Events
    • Current Exhibition
    • Lectures and Conferences

New Faculty Appointments

by Tom Elliott May 20, 2011

The Institute for the Study of the Ancient World at New York University is pleased to announce the addition of two new professors to the faculty: Lorenzo d'Alfonso and Roderick B. Campbell.

Lorenzo d'Alfonso, Assistant Professor of Ancient Western Asian Archaeology and History

Professor d'Alfonso earned his MA in Ancient Civilizations from the University of Pavia (1997) and his PhD in Ancient Anatolian and Aegean Studies from the University of Florence (2002). Since then he has worked as a post-doctoral fellow and adjunct professor at the Universities of Mainz, Konstanz, and Pavia.

His main research interests concern the social, juridical, and political history of Syria and Anatolia under the Hittite Empire and during its aftermath (16th-7th centuries BC). On these themes he has published a monograph on the judicial procedures of the Hittite administration in Syria (2005), a website of textual references (The Emar Online Database), more than 30 articles in volumes and journals, and co-edited two important volumes.

From 2006 to 2009 he was the director of an archaeological survey in Southern Cappadocia, and since 2010 he has concentrated his efforts on the site of Kınık Höyük (Nigde, Turkey)


Roderick B. Campbell, Assistant Professor of Early Chinese Art and Archaeology

Professor Campbell graduated from Harvard in 2007 with a dual degree in
 Anthropology (Archaeology) and East Asian Languages and Civilizations 
(Chinese History). Prior to coming to ISAW he was the Peter Moores Research Fellow in Chinese Archaeology at Merton College, University of Oxford. His research has been focused on theorizing ancient
 social-political organization, social violence and history and his 
geographical and temporal focus has been late 2nd millennium BC north
 China although an interest in broader comparison and long-term change is
 beginning to draw him beyond Shang China.

 With training as an archaeologist, historian and
 epigrapher, his work attempts to unite disparate sources of evidence 
with contemporary social theory.

Professor Campbell’s current fieldwork project, a collaboration with archaeologists from
 the Chinese Academy of Social Sciences, is a zooarchaeological production analysis on what may be the world’s largest collection of
 worked bone at Anyang, the last capital of the Shang dynasty. Recent 
publications have included an article on early complex polities for
 Current Anthropology and a report on the Origin of Chinese 
Civilization Project (with Yuan Jing) for Antiquity. He has recently 
finished an edited volume manuscript on Violence and Civilization for 
the Joukowsky Institute publication series and is finishing up another 
manuscript on the archaeology of the Chinese Bronze Age for the Cotsen
 Institute. He has received numerous fellowships, awards and grants for 
his work including ones from the Luce Archaeology Initiative, the 
Chiang Ching-kuo foundation, and the Canadian Social Sciences and 
Humanities Research Council.


Professor Campbell will begin offering seminars this fall, and Professor d'Alfonso in the spring of 2012. Please join us in welcoming them to our community.

Roger Bagnall, Leon Levy Director

Pleiades Featured in Project Bamboo Demonstrator

Project Bamboo has launched Places-Text, a feature demonstrator to illustrate how the possible service in Bamboo’s infrastructure could give researchers analytic tools to identify places mentioned in texts, including books, journal articles, and Web pages.
by Tom Elliott Jun 01, 2011

In the Project Bamboo blog, Dr. Eric Kansa writes about the proposed "Places-Text" service. The blog post includes links to a demonstrator site and an introductory video. As explained by Kansa, the Places-Text demonstrator makes use of geographic content from our Pleiades project, by way of an on-going collaboration with Google Ancient Places.

The Places-Text service demo is one of several anticipated demonstrations of existing and possible applications and infrastructure being explored by the Mellon-funded Project Bamboo.

VRS Annalisa Marzano promoted

Annalisa Marzano, visiting research scholar 2010-11, promoted to Reader.
by Roger Bagnall Jun 15, 2011

Annalisa Marzano, Visiting Research Scholar at ISAW during 2010-11, has been promoted to the rank of Reader at the University of Reading. Promotion to Reader is based on distinction in research. Last fall Dr. Marzano received the VIII Premio Romanistico Internazionale Gérard Boulvert, honoring her book Roman Villas in Central Italy.

Pleiades reports major additions of ancient geographic data

by Tom Elliott Jun 18, 2011
Pleiades reports major additions of ancient geographic data

Pleiades map display showing both roughly and precisely located ancient features

Digital Epigraphy in Jakarta

by Tom Elliott Aug 03, 2011
Digital Epigraphy in Jakarta

EpiDoc Jakarta participants

Between 8-18 July, Tom Elliott visited the Jakarta Research Centre of the École française d'Extrême-Orient as a guest of Prof. Arlo Griffiths. The primary purpose of the visit was to evaluate the suitability of the EpiDoc method for digital encoding of ancient documents to a range of projects in the epigraphy of South and Southeast Asia being undertaken by the Jakarta Centre.

EpiDoc has already been successfully used for a range of Greek, Latin and circum-Mediterranean projects, including http://papyri.info. The successful workshop in Jakarta opens new opportunities, including collaboration between ISAW and EFEO on the Corpus of the Inscriptions of Campā, which comprises over 250 texts in Sanskrit and Old Cam from Vietnam.

More information about the EpiDoc sessions in Jakarta is available on the EFEO blog.

Grant Received for Linked Ancient World Data Institute

by Tom Elliott Aug 12, 2011

On 27 July 2011, the National Endowment for the Humanities announced the award of a $217,000 grant for a two-year series of summer seminars on the possibilities of the Linked Open Data model for use in humanities scholarship with a particular focus on Ancient Mediterranean and Near East studies.  The seminars will be hosted by New York University's Institute for the Study of the Ancient World and by Drew University. They are designed for humanities scholars, library and museum professionals, and advanced graduate students.

This award is one of five funded this year as part of the NEH's Institutes for Advanced Topics in the Digital Humanities program. Tom Elliott is the project director for NYU. Sebastian Heath will act as project manager for ISAW. John Muccigrosso will serve as the project director at Drew. More information on the seminars will announced next month.

Sabine Huebner Wins 5-year Heisenberg Grant

by Tom Elliott Aug 25, 2011

PD Dr. Sabine Huebner, Privatdozentin at Freie Universitaet Berlin,  has been awarded a 5-year Heisenberg grant by the German Research  Foundation. The predominant aim of the generously endowed Heisenberg  grant is to support young scientists who are already eligible for professorships and in addition distinguish themselves through especially outstanding scientific achievements. Apart from other ongoing projects, Sabine is planning on writing a book on the family in later Roman and early Byzantine times. She will spend the first two years at the Collège de France in Paris and the following three years at the University of Cologne. Sabine was a member of the first cohort of visiting research scholars at ISAW in 2007-8.

Updates to papyri.info

by Tom Elliott Sep 02, 2011

Josh Sosin has just announced several significant upgrades to the papyrological information resources provided at papyri.info, a collaborative project in which ISAW is a major partner. These upgrades include the addition of new individuals to the editorial boards that review site content; the improvement of some search, display and editing functions; and the addition of new documents (some 2,000 in the last year). More information is available via Josh's blog post at digitalpapyrology.blogspot.com.

The screen capture (click image to enlarge) shows part of the papyri.info display for a 4th century CE loan contract from Karanis in Egypt. This document is now held in Bobst Library at NYU. You can learn more about it by viewing the full papyri.info display for P.NYU 2 23).

Free Photos of Edfu, Egypt

The latest additions to ISAW's open-access Ancient World Image Bank.
by Tom Elliott Sep 10, 2011

On September 9, Nate Nagy, the Managing Editor of ISAW's Ancient World Image Bank, released 9 new photographs of the ancient site of Edfu in Egypt. These photos, taken and contributed by Erik Hermans, depict architectural components and reliefs from the Ptolemaic temple to Horus of Behdet at Edfu (ancient Apollonopolis Magna/Behdet).

Like all AWIB content, these photos are free to share, reuse and remix under terms of a Creative Commons Attribution license.

Image: Falcon Statue at Edfu. A granite statue of Horus, depicted as a falcon, at the Ptolemaic temple at Edfu. By Iris Fernandez (2009).

New Faculty Opening - Professor (Open Rank), Near Eastern Art & Arch., Late Prehistoric and Early Historic Periods

by Kathryn Lawson Sep 15, 2011

The Institute for the Study of the Ancient World, New York University, seeks to make an appointment (tenured or tenure-track, rank open) of a scholar with a focus in the archaeology and art of the Near Eastern world, broadly defined, in the late prehistoric and early historic periods, who can blend disciplinary approaches to interpret objects, sites, and landscapes. We are looking for someone with a broad range of interests and a commitment to the study of cultural connections across geographical and chronological lines. For application details, please visit http://isaw.nyu.edu/jobs/faculty/professor-open-rank-near-eastern-art-archaeology-late-prehistoric-and-early-historic-periods.

Dura-Europos Exhibition Opens

by Tom Elliott Sep 23, 2011

The latest exhibition at NYU's Institute for the Study of the Ancient World opens today: Edge of Empires: Pagans, Jews, and Christians at Roman Dura-Europos. It runs through January 8, 2012. Admission for individuals is free. Hours are 11am - 6pm (11am - 8pm on Fridays), closed Mondays.

The exhibition illustrates the international, indeed pluralistic character of Dura-Europos, highlighting objects that demonstrate the coexistence of multiple religions — including polytheistic cults, Judaism, and Christianity — the great variety of languages employed by its population, and its role as an international military garrison.

More information is available on ISAW's Exhibitions webpage.

One Thousand Open Access Journals

AWOL's List of Open Access Journals in Ancient Studies now lists one thousand titles.
by chuck.jones@nyu.edu Sep 28, 2011

On 28 September 2011, The Ancient World Online (AWOL) posted an entry on Zephyrvs, a Spanish journal of archaeology and Prehistory. With this entry AWOL's index of Open Access Journals in Ancient Studies reaches the milestone of one thousand titles.

We first assembled the Alphabetical list of Open Access Journals in Ancient Studies in observance of Open Access Week 2009, just under two years ago. It was based on journals cited in AWOL since its beginning in January 2009 . At that time the list included more than two hundred titles - a surprisingly large number - or so we thought at the time. In an effort to make the List canonical and comprehensive, we began adding in groups of twenty titles additional journals, all (or nearly all) of which had been accessible via Abzu for varying lengths of time. At the same time, we continued to add newly discovered and newly emerging titles to the list, constantly verifying older links and repairing broken ones. On February 17, 2010 the list reached six hundred titles, on July 7, 2010 the list reached seven hundred titles, and on May 5, 2011, with the addition of Engramma, the list reached nine hundred titles.

The Ancient World Online (AWOL) is one of a subset of digital initiatives of the Institute for the Study of the Ancient World at New York University that the ISAW library is undertaking to develop as components of the Ancient World Digital Library (AWDL). They include the following:
  • Ancient World Digital Library Book Viewer - The first fruits of an effort to accelerate and enhance access to the emerging global library of digital publications on the ancient world, the AWDL Book Viewer lets users read and search digitized copies of previously printed scholarly materials.
  • Ancient World Online - Find out about all the latest online and open-access material relating to the ancient world, regardless of where it's published.

and

  • Abzu - A guide to networked open access data relevant to the study and public presentation of the Ancient Near East and the Ancient Mediterranean world.

 

Those interested can subscribe to receive AWOL updates by email.  Enter your address in the form here.  Updates are also posted regularly to the ISAW Library Facebook page, and on Twitter @ISAWLibrary.

Spotlight On: Visiting Research Scholar Daniel Caner

by Kathryn Lawson Sep 28, 2011

Daniel Caner is one of nine new visiting research scholars at ISAW for 2011-12. Dr. Caner’s home institution is the University of Connecticut, Storrs where he is Associate Professor in History and Classics. He specializes in the social and religious history of late antiquity, more specifically Christian monasticism in the Roman World. Recently his focus has centered on the complex issues of gift-giving and religious wealth. At ISAW he is working on a book entitled The Rich and the Pure: Christian Gifts and Religious Society in Early Byzantium. He will be giving the first Visiting Research Scholar Lecture of the year on Tuesday, October 4th at 6pm on “Christian Wealth and the Challenge of Charity in Early Byzantium.”  For more information on Dr. Caner and his upcoming lecture, visit http://isaw.nyu.edu/events/visiting-research-scholar-lecture.

Subscribe to ISAW News via Email (and more)

by Tom Elliott Sep 30, 2011

We provide a variety of ways for you to follow the latest news from ISAW. Whenever you like, you can visit our news blog online. If you prefer to have news delivered to you, just subscribe to news updates via webfeed (RSS) or via email (just fill out the simple form, courtesy of Feedburner). Or you can follow us on Twitter or "like" us on Facebook. Whichever approach you take, you'll stay up to date on the full spectrum of research, publication, and outreach activities at ISAW.

ISAW Now Accepting Visiting Research Scholar Applications for Fall 2012

by Kathryn Lawson Oct 05, 2011

Each year the Institute for the Study of the Ancient World, New York University, makes about 7-10 appointments of visiting research scholars. We are now accepting applications for fellowships beginning in fall 2012. ISAW's scope embraces the history, archaeology, and culture of the entire Old World from late prehistoric times to the eighth century AD, including Asia and Africa. Projects of a theoretical or comparative nature relevant to this domain are also welcome. Academic visitors at ISAW should be individuals of scholarly distinction or promise in any relevant field of ancient studies who will benefit from the stimulation of working in an environment with colleagues in other disciplines. Applicants with a history of interdisciplinary exchange are particularly welcome. They are expected to be in residence at the Institute during the academic terms for which they are appointed and to take part in the intellectual life of the community.

For details about the categories of fellows, financial support, and the application, please visit http://isaw.nyu.edu/academics/visiting-scholars. The deadline for applications is December 10, 2011. New York University is an equal opportunity/affirmative action employer.

Spotlight On: Visiting Research Scholar Sarah Laursen

by Kathryn Lawson Oct 13, 2011

Sarah Laursen is one of two 2-year scholars at ISAW for 2011-13. She holds a BA in East Asian Studies and Art History from New York University and an MA and PhD in East Asian Languages and Civilizations from the University of Pennsylvania.  Her research focuses primarily on gold personal adornments from Eastern Han to Sui dynasty (26 – 618 CE) tombs and explores how this facet of material culture reflects Chinese interactions with the nomadic populations of the northern steppe. In addition to working on her research project, "Unearthing the Ancient Craft: The Art of Goldsmithing in Early Medieval China,” which will investigate gold objects excavated throughout China and their relationship to the metalworking traditions of Inner Asia, the Mediterranean, and Mesopotamia, she will also be teaching an ISAW graduate seminar and undergraduate NYU courses.

For more information on Dr. Laursen and her upcoming lecture on October 18th, visit http://isaw.nyu.edu/events/visiting-research-scholar-lecture-1.

Open Access at ISAW

by Tom Elliott Oct 27, 2011

In recognition and support of Open Access Week, this post lists digital resources currently available from ISAW and its collaborators under the terms of open licenses:

Ancient World Image Bank
View and download over 2,000 free digital images of sites and objects from the ancient world, contributed by ISAW faculty, staff and friends.
Content License: Creative Commons Attribution
Ancient World Online
Find out about all the latest online and open-access material relating to the ancient world, regardless of where it's published.
Content License: Creative Commons Attribution No Derivatives Share-Alike
Papyri.info
Search and browse over 80,000 ancient Greek, Latin and Coptic documents preserved on papyrus and other materials. Images, texts, translations and descriptions contributed by scholars and institutions around the world. Funded by the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation and the National Endowment for the Humanities.
Content License (texts and descriptive information): Creative Commons Attribution or Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial
Software License: GNU General Public License
Pleiades
Use, create and share information about ancient places, spaces and geographic names. Over 30,000 places registered (and growing). Funded by the National Endowment for the Humanities.
Content License: Creative Commons Attribution
Software Licenses: GNU General Public License and other open-source licenses

Marianne Bergmann to Give ISAW's 5th Annual Leon Levy Lecture

by Kathryn Lawson Oct 28, 2011

ISAW Senior Fellow Marianne Bergmann will be giving the Fifth Annual Leon Levy Lecture on Tuesday, Nov. 1st at 6pm on "A Greek Statuary Complex at the Sarapieion of Memphis and the Early Ptolemaic Kings."

Until 2008, Professor Bergmann was the director of the Archaeological Institute at the University of Goettingen, where she also taught classical archaeology. She has published on Roman portraits of the 3rd century AD and other questions of Roman portraiture, on theomorphic representations of Hellenistic, and Roman rulers, and on late antique mythological sculpture. In recent times she has concentrated on problems of Greco-Roman Egypt. With M. Heinzelmann (University of Cologne), she excavates at Schedia near Alexandria.

RSVP is required to isaw@nyu.edu. Reception to follow.

ISAW Newsletter 5 Released

by wls3@nyu.edu Nov 02, 2011

The latest issue of ISAW’s newsletter is now available.  Issue 5 includes introductions to our new faculty, scholars, and graduate students, fieldwork and research updates, and exhibitions and academic event listings for Fall 2011 and beyond.  To download an electronic copy of the newsletter, click here.

Deborah Klimburg-Salter to Give Lecture at ISAW

by Kathryn Lawson Nov 03, 2011

Dr. Deborah Klimburg-Salter is Professor for Asian Art History at the Institute for Art History, University of Vienna. She has also been a visiting professor at the University of Pennsylvania, University of Oxford, The Ecole Practique des Hautes Etudes, and Wellesley College. She specializes in South and Central Asian art history and is the author of numerous books and articles including Tabo Monastery: Art and History (2005) , Tabo: a lamp for a kingdom: Early Indo-Tibetan Buddhist Art in the Western Himalaya (1997), and The Cultural History of Western Tibet (ed. with Junyun, Tauscher, and Yuan 2008). She is a member of the European Association of South Asian Archaeologists in Western Europe (EASAA) and since 2007 has directed the research project "The Cultural History of the Western Himalaya from the 8th Century" at the National Research Network, sponsored by the Austrian Science Fund.

Dr. Klimburg-Salter will be presenting a lecture at ISAW on Tuesday, November 8th at 6pm on "New Archaeological Discoveries in Afghanistan: Mes Aynak, Tepe Naranj and the Buddhist Art of the Kabul River Valley".

Spotlight On: Visiting Research Scholar Alexander Dale

by Kathryn Lawson Nov 09, 2011

 

Alexander Dale is one of nine visiting research scholars at ISAW for 2011-12. He earned his DPhil in 2009 from the University of Oxford in the field of Classics. His primary areas of research interest and expertise are Greek poetry, particularly of the Archaic and Hellenistic periods; Greek meter and literary papyrology; and historical linguistics, particularly of the Greek and Anatolian branches of Indo-European. In addition to working on his research project at ISAW, "The East Shore of Lesbos: Greek Poetry at the East Aegean-West Anatolian Interface,” which will focus on the nature and extent of the influence of the Anatolian languages and cultures of the second and first millennia BC on early archaic Greek language and literature in the east Aegean and Asia Minor, he will also be organizing a workshop on The Aegeo-Anatolian Interface: Evidence and Implications which will take place in April 2012.

Dr. Dale will be giving lecture on Tuesday, November 15 at 6pm on Dynamics of Acculturation and Integration: the Aegeo-Anatolian Interface in the Second and First Millennia BC. For more information on Dr. Dale and his upcoming lecture, visit http://isaw.nyu.edu/events/visiting-research-scholar-lecture-dynamics-of-acculteration-and-integration-the-aegeo-anatolian-interface-in-the-second-and-first-millenia-bc.

 

All Roads Lead to (Ancient) Rome

by Kathryn Lawson Nov 10, 2011

Gilles Bransbourg, an ISAW Research Associate and Assistant Roman Curator at the American Numismatic Society, has written an article published in the current edition of Newsweek Magazine on what Ancient Rome can teach us about the current debt crisis and the euro. Click here to read the online edition. For more information on Dr. Bransbourg, visit his ISAW profile here.

New book: an Egyptian tax register

A newly-published tax register from the Egyptian village of Temseu Skordon gives a rare look into the economic and social structure of a rural community in the sixth century CE.
by Roger Bagnall Nov 19, 2011

The tax account occupies more than 50 pages of a codex in the British Library, long known but never published. Its more than 1500 lines give us the names of landowners and the amounts of money they paid for the land tax in 546/7. Rich and poor, men and women, living people and estates, institutions and individuals all appear, giving us a close look at how wealth was divided in an entire village and at the workings of the taxation system.

The volume, A Sixth-century Tax Register from the Hermopolite Nome, has just been published by ISAW Director Roger Bagnall together with James G. Keenan and Leslie S. B. MacCoull in American Studies in Papyrology. It is available from the David Brown Book Company (US) and Oxbow Books (UK).

New Book from VRS Alumnus Oleksandr Symonenko

by Kathryn Lawson Nov 21, 2011

Oleksandr V. Symonenko, ISAW Visiting Research Scholar 2009-10, has just published a new book in Russian entitled The Roman Import from the North Pontic Sarmatians (St. Petersburg: St. Petersburg State University Faculty of Philology Press, 2011). Dr. Symonenko is the 2011-12 Glassman Holland Research Fellow at the W.F. Albright Institute of Archaeological Research in Jerusalem. He is also Chief Research Fellow of the Institute of Archaeology at the Ukrainian National Academy of Sciences.

ISAW launches open-access journal

The first article in ISAW Papers hit the web yesterday.
by Tom Elliott Dec 15, 2011

ISAW is happy to announce the launch of ISAW Papers, an open-content scholarly journal that publishes article-length works on any topic within the scope of ISAW's scholarly research. The first paper has just been published: "A New Discovery of a Component of Greek Astrology in Babylonian Tablets: The 'Terms'", by Alexander Jones and John M. Steele.

Joining geography and imagery online

by Tom Elliott Dec 19, 2011

In recent days two of ISAW's flagship online resources — the Ancient World Image Bank and the Pleiades gazetteer — significantly advanced our mission to connect and contextualize information about the ancient world on the web. Photos posted by ISAW and other AWIB collaborators on the Flickr.com photo sharing website are now directly linked with Pleiades place resources and vice versa.

Many people have worked to make this a reality; the heavy lifting was done by Nate Nagy and Iris Fernandez on AWIB, Sean Gillies on Pleiades, and Daniel Bogan at Flickr.  Their work makes it easy to feature thumbnails and lists of related images on individual Pleiades pages and to provide historical-geographic context to photos on Flickr.

You can read more about how all this works in two blog posts by Sean Gillies: one on the Pleiades News Blog and another (a guest blog post) on the Flickr Code Blog.

Apply now for linked ancient world data institute

by Tom Elliott Jan 12, 2012

ISAW will host the Linked Ancient World Data Institute (LAWDI) from May 31st to June 2nd, 2012 in New York City. Applications are due 17 February 2012.

LAWDI, funded by the Office of Digital Humanities of the National Endowment for Humanities, will bring together an international faculty of practitioners working in the field of Linked Data with twenty attendees who are implementing or planning the creation of digital resources.

More information, including a list of faculty, and application instructions are available at the LAWDI page on the Digital Classicist wiki.

ISAW Makes New Faculty Appointment

by Kathryn Lawson Jan 12, 2012

The Institute for the Study of the Ancient World at New York University is pleased to announce the appointment of Robert G. Hoyland as Professor of Late Antique and Early Islamic Middle Eastern History.

Professor Hoyland studied early Islamic history at the University of Oxford where he earned his DPhil in 1994. Prior to coming to ISAW he was Professor of Islamic History at the University of Oxford. He also held previous positions at St. Andrews University and UCLA, and was both a Fulbright (Princeton University) and Erasmus scholar (Groningen University). His scholarly interests lie with the history, languages, and literature of the late antique and early Islamic Middle East, more specifically the relations between Muslims, Jews, and Christians, the links between identity, religion, and ethnicity, and the transmission of knowledge from the Ancient world to the Islamic world.

Prof. Hoyland is the author of Seeing Islam as Others Saw it: A survey and analysis of the Christian, Jewish, and Zoroastrian writings on Islam (1997), and Arabia and the Arabs from the Bronze Age to the Coming of Islam (2001). His most recent books include Theophilus of Edessa’s Chronicle: and the Circulation of Historical Knowledge in Late Antiquity and Early Islam (2011) and Doctrine and Debate in the East Christian World, 300-1500 (with Averil Cameron, 2011). He is also a member of the editorial committee of the Library of Arabic Literature, which aims to establish a Loeb-style translation series for Arabic texts, to be published with NYU Press, and is involved in the Oxford excavation of Andarin, a Byzantine/Early Islamic town in Syria.

Please join us in welcoming Prof. Hoyland to our community this fall.

A Hellenistic astrologer's board from Croatia

by Alexander Jones Jan 19, 2012
A Hellenistic astrologer's board from Croatia

Sector for the zodiacal sign Cancer from the Nakovana Astrologer's Board

In a paper just published in the Journal for the History of Astronomy, Stašo Forenbaher (Institute for Anthropological Research, Zagreb) and Alexander Jones (ISAW) announce the discovery of ivory fragments of a Hellenistic astrologer's board in a part of a cave in southern Croatia that was sealed off towards the end of the first century BCE after having served as a cultic sanctuary. The board, which an astrologer would have used to display to his client the arrangement of heavenly bodies in a horoscope, is the oldest such object known to exist. It witnesses the rapid spread of Greek horoscopic astrology, which came into existence as a fusion of Mesopotamian and Egyptian astral divination with Greek cosmology probably not long before 100 BCE.

Nakovana Cave overlooks the Adriatic Sea from a ridge near the western tip of Pelješac Peninsula, 100 kilometers northwest of Dubrovnik. Some of the most important Adriatic sea-lines of antiquity pass through the channels below the cave. The Nakovana Project (directed by Timothy Kaiser and Stašo Forenbaher) began work at the cave in 1999, and towards the end of the field season a hitherto unknown extension of the cave was discovered. Fragments of pottery vessels were lying about, most of them Hellenistic finewares datable to the last four centuries BCE, evidently the accumulated remains from cult offerings. The ivory fragments were discovered among this material.

When complete, the board had twelve arc-shaped ivory plates forming a complete circle and representing the twelve signs of the zodiac. An astrologer would have displayed a horoscope by placing colored stones standing for the Sun, Moon, and planets in the places they occupied in the zodiac on a particular date, for example a client's birthdate. It is not clear whether the board was actually used where its remains were found in Nakovana cave or whether it was deposited there as a precious offering.

ISAW Newsletter 6 Now Available

by wls3@nyu.edu Feb 29, 2012

The Spring 2012 issue of ISAW’s newsletter is now available.  Issue 6 includes a preview of the Nomads and Networks exhibition, publications and research updates from the ISAW community, and event listings for Spring 2012 and beyond.  To download an electronic copy of the newsletter, click here.

New Book: From the Ptolemies to the Romans

by Tom Elliott Mar 05, 2012

Cambridge University Press has just published From the Ptolemies to the Romans: Political and economic change in Egypt, by Andrew Monson, Assistant Professor of Classics at NYU and an affiliated faculty member at ISAW.

In this book, Monson looks at the impact of the coming of Roman rule to Egypt, using theoretical perspectives from the social sciences as well as a reexamination of the extensive papyrological evidence to argue for a primary importance for fiscal reform as an agent of change.

More information is available from the publisher's website.

New exhibition on inflation opening March 30 at the Federal Reserve Bank of New York

by Kathryn Lawson Mar 14, 2012

The American Numismatic Society will open a new exhibition on Signs of Inflation at the Federal Reserve Bank in New York on March 30, 2012. Organized by Gilles Bransbourg, ANS Assistant Roman Curator and ISAW Research Associate, the exhibition displays a range of materials, including ancient coins, money-shells and banknotes, and examines the role of inflation from Imperial Rome to contemporary Zimbabwe. For more information, see the ANS website at http://www.numismatics.org/Exhibits/SignsofInflation.

New Book from VRS Alum Anne Porter

by Kathryn Lawson Mar 30, 2012

Anne Porter, one of ISAW's visiting research scholars in 2007-08, has announced the publication of her new book, Mobile Pastoralism and the Formation of Near Eastern Civilizations, by Cambridge University Press. Much of the research was undertaken during Dr. Porter's time at ISAW. The book argues that mobile and sedentary populations were not fundamentally separate groups, but formed integral parts of the same polities throughout greater Mesopotamia during the period 4000 to 1500 BCE. She draws on a wide range of archaeological and cuneiform sources to show how networks of social structure, political and religious ideology, and everyday as well as ritual practice, worked to maintain the integrity of those groups when the pursuit of different subsistence activities dispersed them over space. Dr. Porter also shows how these networks shaped many of the key events and innovations of the time, including the Uruk expansion and the introduction of writing, so-called secondary state formation and the organization and operation of government, the literary production of the Third Dynasty of Ur and the first stories of Gilgamesh, and the emergence of the Amorrites in the second millennium BCE.

Wu Hung Elected to American Philosophical Society

ISAW Senior Fellow Wu Hung, Harrie A. Vanderstappen Distinguished Service Professor of Art History and East Asian Languages and Civilizations at the University of Chicago and ISAW Advisory Committee member, has been elected to membership in the American Philosophical Society.
by Diane Bennett Apr 23, 2012

His research interests include relationships between visual forms (architecture, bronze vessels, pictorial carvings and murals, etc.) and ritual, social memory, and political discourses in early Chinese art. He also serves as Director for the Center for the Art of East Asia and Consulting Curator at the Smart Museum of Art.

Election to the APS honors extraordinary achievements in all fields, representing leading scholars in a wide variety of academic disciplines representing over 24 countries.  Founded by Benjamin Franklin and based in Philadelphia, the Society accepts nominations for membership only from Resident members of the APS. More information can be found at http://www.amphilsoc.org/about.

'Influential Neighbors' in the Wall Street Journal

by Diane Bennett May 01, 2012

Melik Kaylan writes in the Wall Street Journal for 1 May 2012 concerning ISAW's Nomads and Networks exhibition, as follows:

As the world shrinks, one is increasingly grateful for glimpses of cultures, farflung in time or place, that stir up one's inner Tintin or Conan Doyle with a sense of irreducible mystery. The Institute for the Study of the Ancient World (ISAW) seems dedicated to bringing us just such glimpses—in the most scholarly way, of course, it being a branch of New York University. The Institute's whimsically old-world setting accentuates the feeling of discovery.

You walk into a repurposed townhouse—externally discreet, internally grand—just off upper Fifth Avenue and find a wholly unimaginable experience, an encounter, say, with 3000 B.C. Nubia or with Danube Valley relics from 5000 B.C. (two shows from recent years). The current show, "Nomads and Networks: The Ancient Art and Culture of Kazakhstan," couldn't be more splendidly esoteric, focusing as it does on that most perennially opaque of the earth's remote regions, the vast steppe-lands of Eurasia...

Read the entire article online at wsj.com.

New Book from VRS Alum Mathieu Ossendrijver

by Kathryn Lawson May 07, 2012

Mathieu Ossendrijver, one of ISAW's visiting research scholars in 2010-11, has published a new book entitled Babylonian Mathematical Astronomy: Procedure Texts, part of the Sources and Studies in the History of Mathematics and Physical Sciences series from Springer. The book contains a new analysis of the procedure texts of Babylonian mathematical astronomy. These cuneiform tablets, excavated in Babylon and Uruk and dating from 350-50 BCE, contain computational instructions that represent the earliest known form of mathematical astronomy of the ancient world. The book includes new translations of all 108 available tablets accompanied by commentaries and color photographs of the tablets. The preceding chapters are devoted to documentary, lexical, semantic, mathematical and astronomical aspects of the procedure texts. Special attention is given to issues of  mathematical representation, a topic that had previously been largely ignored. Mathematical concepts are presented in a didactic fashion, setting out from the most elementary ones (numbers and elementary operations) to more complex ones (algorithms and computational systems). Chapters devoted to the planets and the Moon contain updated and expanded reconstructions and astronomical interpretations of the algorithms.

From: http://www.springer.com/mathematics/history+of+mathematics/book/978-1-4614-3781-9

ISAW announces Visiting Research Scholars for 2012-13

by Kathryn Lawson Jun 19, 2012

ISAW is pleased to announce the research scholar roster for 2012-13. In addition to working on the listed research project, each scholar will participate in ISAW seminars and present a public lecture. Please join us in welcoming them to our community this fall!

One-year Visiting Research Scholars:

Victor Alonso Troncoso (University of Corunna) - Spring 2013
The Zoology of Kingship in the Hellenistic Age: From Alexander the Great to the Epigonoi (336 - c.250BC)

Jan Bremmer (Emeritus, University of Groningen)
The Ancient Mysteries: A History

Tosha Dupras (University of Central Florida)
Bioarchaeological Analyses of the Kellis 2 Cemetery Population in the Dakhleh Oasis, Egypt: Reconstructing Life Histories

Dorota Dzierzbicka (PhD, University of Warsaw)
Wine Consumption in Graeco-Roman Egypt: Cultural Transformation and Economic Change

Michael Frachetti (Washington University, St. Louis)
Ancient Inner Asia and the Pulse of Stateless Civilization

Hallie Franks (New York University, Gallatin School)
Traveling the World, in Theory: Metaphor and Movement in Greek Architecture

Richard Payne (Mount Holyoke College)
"States of Mixture": Cosmology, Irreligion, and Society in the Iranian Empire, 224-636 CE

Marja Vierros (PhD, University of Helsinki)
SEMATIA: Linguistic Annotation of the Greek Documentary Papyri? Detecting and determining contact-induced dialectal and stylistic variation in the Greek papyri

Li Zhang (PhD, Peking University)
Wind from the West: Early China and Eurasian Interactions

 

Two-year Visiting Assistant Professors

Emily Hammer (PhD, Harvard)
Dynamics of Settlement and Transhumance in Agricultural Peripheries on the Fringes of Ancient Mesopotamia

George Hatke (PhD, Princeton) - continuing
Africans in Arabia Felix: Relations between Ethiopia and South Arabia in Late Antiquity

Sarah Laursen (PhD, University of Pennsylvania) - continuing
Unearthing the Ancient Craft: The Art of Goldsmithing in Early Medieval China

New ISAW Faculty Appointment for Spring 2013

by Kathryn Lawson Jul 13, 2012

The Institute for the Study of the Ancient World is pleased to announce the appointment of Dr. Daniel T. Potts as Professor of Ancient Near Eastern Archaeology and History, effective January 2013. Dr. Potts comes to us from the University of Sydney where he was Edwin Cuthbert Hall Chair of Middle Eastern Archaeology for over twenty years. Dr. Potts received his PhD in Near Eastern Archaeology from Harvard University in 1980 and then taught at the Freie Universität Berlin and the University of Copenhagen, where he completed his Habilitation in 1991.

Although his research interests are wide-ranging, the majority of his scholarly work has focused on the cultural developments in Iran, Mesopotamia and the Arabian Peninsula, as well as relations between these regions and their neighbors. Chronologically his span is far-reaching; from the Neolithic to late antiquity, but his main focus has been on the transition from pre-history to the Bronze Age in Mesopotamia and Iran, especially the 3rd millennium BCE.

Dr. Potts has led and participated in numerous excavation projects in Iran, Saudi Arabia, Turkey, and the United Arab Emirates. He is the founding editor-in-chief of the journal Arabian Archaeology & Epigraphy, a Corresponding Member of the German Archaeological Institute and a Fellow of the Australian Academy of the Humanities. He is he author of the books In the Land of the Emirates: The Archaeology and History of the UAE (2012), Mesopotamia, Iran and Arabia from the Seleucids to the Sasanians (2010), Mesopotamian Civilization: The material foundations (1997), and The Archaeology of Elam (1999), among others, and has authored and edited a vast number of other books, volumes, chapters, and articles. Most recently he was the editor of the forthcoming Oxford Handbook of Iranian Archaeology (2013).

Dr. Potts will begin offering seminars  in the Spring 2013 semester. Please join us in welcoming him into the ISAW community.

New Images: The Serapeum of Alexandria

by Tom Elliott Jul 18, 2012

Twenty new, open-access images have been added to the Ancient World Image Bank.

These photographs of the Serapeum of Alexandria, taken by AWIB's managing editor Iris Fernandez, can be viewed online and downloaded via ISAW's Flickr account. They are also featured in our collaborative Ancient World Image Bank group.

Users of the Pleiades website -- our joint geographical project with the Ancient World Mapping Center at the University of North Carollna -- will find that these images, along with many others, are linked from the Pleiades "place page" for Alexandria.

New Online Resource for Roman Coins: OCRE

by Tom Elliott Jul 19, 2012

On the 17th of July, the American Numismatic Society announced the launch of Online Coins of the Roman Empire (OCRE), a major new tool to aid in the identification, research and cataloging of the coins of the ancient world. Produced in collaboration with ISAW, OCRE presents, in an easily searchable form, all the varieties of the coinage issued by the emperors of ancient Rome. The initial phase covers the coinage of the first emperors, from Augustus to Hadrian (27 BC – AD 138).

ANS database developer Ethan Gruber, who built OCRE, explains how it has been designed from the beginning to use a Linked Data approach to deliver added functionality:

OCRE is built on Numishare, an open source suite of applications for managing and publishing numismatic collections on the web.  The underlying data model of the collection is the Numismatic Description Standard (NUDS), a linked data-influenced XML ontology for coins.  NUDS enables the linking of coin types in OCRE to numismatic concepts represented on Nomisma.org as well as linking to web resources that describe physical specimens, such as those in the ANS' own collection.  Data about these specimens­–images, weights, findspots–can be extracted for statistical and geographic analyses in OCRE.

OCRE linked data is published in a standard format specified by the Pelagios project, which means that other websites -- like ISAW's collaborative geographic database Pleiades -- can automatically link to all the coins found or minted at a particular location. See, for example, the Pleiades place resource for Emerita Augusta (modern Merida, Spain), where you will find a link to 15 coins minted at Emerita Augusta in the right-hand column, under the subheading "Pelagios Annotations from Online Coins of the Roman Empire."

OCRE project manager and Roman specialist Gilles Bransbourg, who is an ISAW Research Associate, describes the advance that is heralded by OCRE:

OCRE is a leap forward for the numismatists, historians and archaeologists alike. Until now, any research into Roman imperial coinage had to rely on paper-based catalogues, online auctions or the very few collections available online. OCRE offers a single central online catalogue that allows users to view download and organize digitized information that aims at covering the entire history of the Roman imperial coinage. The attraction of OCRE is that it is built as an open system. Any significant public or private collection may now link itself to OCRE and make its coins available to the wider public. Coin types will be connected to a growing number of examples from an ever-expanding number of sources. The digitized availability of relevant information like weights, modules, materials, legends, images, issuers, mints, location of find, and finally pictures, opens vast fields of research in many different directions and will hopefully inspire other areas in numismatics and beyond.

You can read the full ANS press release about OCRE online in PDF format. It includes more information about OCRE's creation and capabilities.

New Images: Marea, Alezio

by Tom Elliott Jul 26, 2012
New Images: Marea, Alezio

Terracotta stamp from Alezio, now in the Museo Archeologico Provinciale 'S. Castromediano', Lecce. Photo by Dan Diffendale. cc-by-sa

Newly added to the Ancient World Image Bank group photo pool on Flickr:

 

There is more information (and more photos!) on the Ancient World Image Bank page.

Fiona Kidd Receives Curatorial Appointment at The Metropolitan Museum of Art

by Kathryn Lawson Jul 30, 2012

ISAW is pleased to announce the appointment of Fiona Kidd (ISAW Visiting Research Scholar 2011-12) as Assistant Curator in the Department of Ancient Near Eastern Art at The Metropolitan Museum of Art beginning September 4, 2012.

For the past year Dr. Kidd has been working at ISAW on her research project, Beyond the Boundaries: Identifying Exchange Relations in Central Asian Visual Art Based on the Akchakhan-kala ‘Portraits’, and presented a lecture on the topic as part of the ISAW Visiting Research Scholar Lecture Series in March 2012.

Dr. Kidd received her PhD in Central Asian Archaeology at the University of Sydney in 2005 with a dissertation entitled The Samarkand region of Sogdiana: figurines, costume and identity; 2nd-1st century BCE – 8th century CE. Since 2008 she has held an Australian Research Council Postdoctoral Fellowship at the University of Syndey where she was working on ancient Central Asian wall painting, specifically Chorasmian mural art. She has published articles and book chapters and has several forthcoming and in-preparation publications, including her first monograph on Central Asia. She is also currently working with ISAW Professor Sören Stark as co-editor of The Oxford Handbook of Central Asian Archaeology. Since 1997 she has been involved in several fieldwork projects in Kazakhstan, Afghanistan, Uzbekistan and Syria.

We are excited that Dr. Kidd will be working at such a distinguished institution so near to ISAW and look forward to her continued involvement in the ISAW community in the coming years.

New Bulletin of Online Emendations to Papyri

by Tom Elliott Aug 07, 2012

James Cowey and Rodney Ast (Institut für Papyrologie, Universität Heidelberg) have just issued the second number in their series "Bulletin of Online Emendations to Papyri." The bulletin, which is freely available online in PDF format, lists all textual emendations that have been entered online at papyri.info and vetted by members of its scholarly editorial board. These emendations have not previously appeared in print. Fifty-one texts on papyri and ostraka are addressed in this issue.

Papyri.info is an open-access papyrological information system built and operated by ISAW and NYU Digital Library Technology services in collaboration with Duke University, Heidelberg University, the University of Kentucky, King's College London, and other institutions and scholars world-wide. In addition to institutional support and scholarly volunteer labor, papyri.info is supported by major funding from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation and the National Endowment for the Humanities.

ISAW Now Accepting VRS Applications for 2013-14

by Kathryn Lawson Aug 20, 2012

ISAW is now accepting applications for its Visiting Research Scholar program. Positions are available for two-year visiting assistant professors, one-year visiting research scholars (full or partial funding) and postdoctoral scholars with their own external funding.

Full information about the program, and links to the online applications, are available on the ISAW Visiting Scholars Program page.

Student IT Support Jobs at ISAW

by Tom Elliott Aug 21, 2012

ISAW is seeking current NYU students for part-time work as "IT Support Wizards" for the coming academic year. Eligible NYU students can view the job description and apply online via the NYU CareerNet system offered by the NYU Wasserman Center for Career Development (job id 866757). We regret that applications cannot be taken by other means.

Conference on the Reception of Antiquity

by Tom Elliott Aug 23, 2012

ISAW is delighted to announce a one-day, public conference entitled The Reception of Antiquity: China and Europe, which will begin on Friday, 28 September 2012 at the Institute. Due to space limitations, RSVP is required via email to isaw@nyu.edu. Complete information is available on the conference website.

Description

Antiquity has its prolonged life through memories and imaginations that were shaped by textual and visual remains. Antiquarianism, which became an intellectual trend in China in the 11th century and in Europe in the 14th century, has captured much scholarly attention. Not limited to antiquarianism, this conference will explore more broadly the reception of antiquity in Chinese and European contexts. It will investigate questions such as what is antiquity? How did collections shape the notions of antiquity, or vice versa? How did the fascination with antiquity trigger new modes of cultural production? What is the role of antiquity in the modern era? This conference is intended to break down chronological, geographical, and disciplinary boundaries, bringing together a diverse and stimulating group of scholars who otherwise might not exchange ideas on the same platform.

Heath, Elliott, Muccigrosso Published in Information Standards Quarterly

by Tom Elliott Sep 11, 2012

The following article has just been published and is available online: Elliott, Thomas, Sebastian Heath, and John Muccigrosso, "Report on the Linked Ancient World Data Institute," Information Standards Quarterly, 2012 Spring/Summer, 24(2/3): 43-45 [ http://www.niso.org/publications/isq/2012/v24no2-3/elliott/ ].

Abstract:

From may 31 to June 2nd, 2012, the Institute for the Study of the Ancient World at New York University hosted the Linked Ancient World Data Institute (LAWDI), an internationally attended workshop funded by the National Endowment for Humanities' Office of Digital Humanities (grant number: ht5004811). this three-day event mixed longer presentations by invited speakers with presentations by twenty applicants who had submitted statements of interest on why their work would benefit from intensive interaction with colleagues also pursuing digital publication of scholarly resources on the public internet.

Fourth Century Papyrus Fragment Refers to the Wife of Jesus

by Kathryn Lawson Sep 19, 2012

Roger Bagnall, director of ISAW, was one of two papyrologists asked to examine the fourth century papyrus fragment recently identified by Karen L. King, Hollis Professor of Divinity at Harvard University. Written in Coptic and only 4 by 8 centimeters, it contains the phrase 'Jesus said to them, my wife', sparking controversy in the scholarly world and reporting from various news media across the globe. After examining the piece with AnneMarie Luijendijk of Princeton University, Prof. Bagnall believes the fragment to be authentic.

Below find a link to the Harvard Divinity School website containing images and a translation of the text, along with a draft of Prof. King's article.

http://www.hds.harvard.edu/faculty-research/research-projects/the-gospel-of-jesuss-wife

Hunters, Heroes, Kings: The Frieze of Tomb II at Vergina

A new book by ISAW Visiting Research Scholar Hallie Franks
by chuck.jones@nyu.edu Oct 02, 2012

This monograph, published in the series Ancient Art and Architecture in Context from the American School of Classical Studies at Athens, considers the painted frieze on the façade of Tomb II at Vergina (ca. 330-280 B.C.) as a visual document that offers vital evidence for the public self-stylings of Macedonian royalty in the era surrounding the reign of Alexander the Great. The hunting scene on the frieze reflects the construction of Macedonian royal identity through the appeal to specific and long-standing cultural traditions, which emerged, long before Alexanders reign, out of a complex negotiation of claims to heroic and local dynastic pasts, regional ideals of kingship, and models of royal behavior provided by the East.

Hallie M. Franks is an Assistant Professor of Ancient Studies at New York University’s Gallatin School of Individualized Study and a Visiting Research Scholar at the Institute for the Study of the Ancient World.  She currently excavates with the American Research Center in Sofia and the NIAM-BAS at the Macedonian site of Heraclea Sintica in south-west Bulgaria. Her next project looks at the metaphorical connections between movement through architecture and travel in ancient Greece.

Hunters, Heroes, Kings: The Frieze of Tomb II at Vergina

by Hallie M. Franks

Ancient Art and Architecture in Context 3
250 pp, 62 col. & b/w figs., 1 col. fold-out
9.5" x 11.5"
Cloth, ISBN: 978-0-87661-966-7
Publication Date: Fall 2012
Retail Price $75
It will be available for sale here: BUY NOW

Faculty Approve Research Assessment Document

by Tom Elliott Oct 03, 2012

ISAW faculty have recently approved a statement on research assessment (PDF), which has been published on the ISAW website. As ISAW was founded to support research in the ancient world, this document lays out our philosophy for pursuing and rewarding excellence in research projects and in the variety of ways—in print, online, and in person—they are communicated to both scholars and the general public. As such, this statement provides context for the rich and growing spectrum of research, publication, and exhibition activities that call ISAW home.

Pleiades/Pelagios Collaboration Featured at Smithsonian.com

by Tom Elliott Oct 04, 2012

Smithsonian.com has just published a short article on recent collaborative work to enhance online mapping of ancient sites and online linking of related archaeological, photographic, textual, numismatic, and museological resources. It highlights the role of the multi-institutional Pelagios project (for which our Pleiades project provides the geographic data) in creating a free, online base map for the ancient world and in joining together the contents of over 15 (and growing) important websites for antiquity.

In coming months, you can expect more exciting developments in the area of online ancient geography from the ISAW Digital Programs team and our extramural partners, including Pelagios, UNC's Ancient World Mapping Center, Harvard's Digital Atlas of Roman and Medieval Civilization, Tuft's Perseus Digital Library, the Alexandria Archive Institute, Johan Åhlfeldt's Regnum Francorum Online, the Deutsches Archäologisches Institut, and the British Museum.

Newsletter 7 Now Available

by wls3@nyu.edu Oct 17, 2012

The Fall 2012 issue of ISAW’s newsletter is now available.  Issue 7 includes  alumni news,  an exploration of our Echoes of the Past exhibition, research updates from the ISAW community, and event listings for Fall 2012 and beyond.  To download an electronic copy of the newsletter, click here.

Bagnall receives Festschrift

ISAW Director Roger Bagnall was presented with Papyrological Texts in Honor of Roger S. Bagnall on October 16.
by Roger Bagnall Oct 18, 2012
Bagnall receives Festschrift

Rodney Ast presenting the volume to Roger Bagnall; photo Adam Bülow-Jacobsen

ISAW Director Roger Bagnall was presented with Papyrological Texts in Honor of Roger S. Bagnall at a surprise champagne reception held at the Ecole Pratique des Hautes Etudes in Paris on October 16, with colleagues from France, Belgium, the Netherlands, Germany, Switzerland, and the UK present to celebrate. The book will appear later this fall as American Studies in Papyrology, volume 53. It contains papyri and ostraca in various ancient languages edited by fifty papyrologists from Europe and North America.

ISAW Closed Monday, 29 October 2012

by Tom Elliott Oct 28, 2012
ISAW Closed Monday, 29 October 2012

Hurricane Sandy in a NASA GEOS image (image courtesy NASA GOES Project)

Because of expected weather conditions and public transportation shutdowns, ISAW will be closed Monday 29 October 2012. All seminars and public events that day are canceled.

ISAW Closed Tuesday, 30 October 2012

by Tom Elliott Oct 29, 2012
ISAW Closed Tuesday, 30 October 2012

NOAA's GOES-13 satellite captured this visible image of Hurricane Sandy battering the U.S. East coast on Monday, Oct. 29 at 9:10 a.m. EDT. Credit: NASA GOES Project

Due to the protracted weather threat presented by Hurricane Sandy and the associated shutdown of all New York area public transportation, ISAW facilities will remain closed on Tuesday, 30 October 2012 and all public events are canceled.

ISAW students, staff, and faculty are urged to monitor the weather situation closely and to remain alert for further communications from ISAW, NYU, and community leaders.

ISAW Open Wednesday: Limited Services

by Tom Elliott Oct 30, 2012

On Wednesday, 31 October 2012, ISAW will be open regular hours for faculty, staff, scholars, and students, and for members of the public wishing to visit the "Echoes of the Past" exhibition. The library will not be open. When and if we are able to reschedule events that were canceled earlier this week because of hurricane Sandy, additional notices will be posted.

ISAW is Up and Running

by Tom Elliott Nov 06, 2012

ISAW's facilities on 84th St. in Manhattan were spared any damage from Hurricane Sandy. We are open regular hours and all public events and exhibitions are proceeding as scheduled.

Reminder: Applications for Visiting Research Scholar Program Due Dec. 2

by Kathryn Lawson Nov 12, 2012

Each year the Institute for the Study of the Ancient World, New York University, makes about 9 appointments of visiting research scholars. ISAW's scope embraces research and graduate education in the history, archaeology, and culture of the entire Old World from late prehistoric times to the eighth century AD, including Asia and Africa. Projects of a theoretical or comparative nature relevant to this domain are also welcome. Academic visitors at ISAW should be individuals of scholarly distinction or promise in any relevant field of ancient studies who will benefit from the stimulation of working in an environment with colleagues in other disciplines. Applicants with a history of interdisciplinary exchange are particularly welcome. Scholars are expected to be in residence at the Institute during the period for which they are appointed and to take part in the intellectual life of the community.

For details about the categories of scholars, the financial support, and the application, please visit http://isaw.nyu.edu/academics/visiting-scholars. The application deadline for 2013/14 appointments is December 2, 2012. New York University is an equal opportunity/affirmative action employer.

Encyclopedia of Ancient History published

The Encyclopedia of Ancient History, with over 5000 articles in 12 volumes, has been published by Wiley-Blackwell. The General Editors include ISAW Director Roger Bagnall and former visiting research scholar Sabine Huebner.
by Roger Bagnall Dec 04, 2012

The Encyclopedia of Ancient History, with over 5000 articles in 12 volumes (plus an index volume), has been published by Wiley-Blackwell. The online version is to become available shortly at Wiley Online Library. The General Editors include ISAW Director Roger Bagnall and former visiting research scholar Sabine Huebner. The more than 1800 authors include ISAW faculty Alexander Jones and Beate Pongratz-Leisten; affiliated faculty Raffaella Cribiore, Barbara Kowalzig, Andrew Monson, Michael Peachin, and Helmut Reimitz; Senior Fellows Piotr Michalowski, Jack Sasson, and John Steele; doctoral student Zoe Misiewicz; former visiting research scholars Günter Dreyer, Jinyu Liu, Rachel Mairs, Annalisa Marzano, Maya Muratov, Mathieu Ossendrijver, Anne Porter, Giovanni Ruffini, and Karen Sonik; research associate Yehudah Cohn; and former staff member Anna Boozer, along with a number of lecturers and visitors.

Two New Publications for ISAW Research Scholar Marja Vierros

by Kathryn Lawson Dec 12, 2012

Marja Vierros, one of the ISAW's 2012-13 visiting research scholars, has announced two book publications this fall. The first, Bilingual Notaries in Hellenistic Egypt. A study of Greek as a second language, describes the language contact situation in Hellenistic Egypt in general and in Pathyris in particular through the analysis of contracts found in bilingual family archives dating to the second and first centuries BCE.

Her second book, Variation and Change in Greek and Latin, co-edited with Martti Leiwo and Hilla Halla-aho, deals with different fractions of Greek and Latin, from the 4th century BCE to the 6th century CE and studies, both conceptually and practically, variation within these fractions using data taken from papyri, inscriptions, graffiti, and texts from manuscripts.

JIAAA Volume 5

by Kathryn Lawson Mar 05, 2013

The editors of the Journal of Inner Asian Art and Archaeology – Judith A. Lerner, Lilla Russell-Smith and Sören Stark – are happy to announce the publication of volume 5. Published under the aegis of ISAW the journal focuses on the archaeology and art and cultural exchanges within the vast area between the Iranian world, western China,  the Siberian steppes and Northwestern India. For the table of contents please visit the journal’s webpage.

ISAW Announces Visiting Research Scholars for 2013-14

by Kathryn Lawson May 14, 2013

ISAW is pleased to announce the research scholar roster for 2013-14. In addition to working on the listed research project, each scholar will participate in ISAW seminars and present a public lecture. Please join us in welcoming them to our community this fall!

One-year Visiting Research Scholars

Matteo Compareti (PhD, Università di Napoli “L’Orientale”)
A study of the religious iconography of Iranian peoples living in China during the Sixteen Kingdoms, Northern & Southern Dynasties, and the Sui & the Tang Dynasties

Daniel Fleming (Hebrew & Judaic Studies, NYU)
‘The Land of Benjamin’ and the Development of Israel and Judah

Anna Lanaro (PhD, Johannes-Gutenburg-University, Mainz)
Beyond Hybridism: Intercultural Connectivity in the Northern Levant During the Late Bronze Age

Francesca Rochberg (Near Eastern Studies, University of California, Berkeley)
Before Nature: Science and Ancient Mesopotamia

Ian Rutherford (Classics, University of Reading)
Hittite Texts and Greek Religion: Borrowing, Hybridity, Comparison

Thelma Thomas (Institute of Fine Arts, NYU)
Dressing Souls, Making Monks: Monastic Habits of the Egyptian Desert Fathers

Liangren Zhang (School of Cultural Heritage, Northwest University, China)
Prehistoric Gansu and Xinjiang in the broad context of Eurasian and Central Asian cultural movements


Two-year Visiting Assistant Professors

Emily Hammer (PhD, Harvard University) – continuing
Dynamics of Settlement and Transhumance in Agricultural Peripheries on the Fringes of Ancient Mesopotamia

Adam Schwartz (PhD, University of Chicago)
Huayuanzhuang East I: A Complete and Annotated Translation of the Newest Corpus of 13th Century BCE Shang Dynasty Non-Royal Oracle Bone Inscriptions

Job: Grants and Excavation Manager

by Tom Elliott May 31, 2013

ISAW is looking for a talented professional who has experience in financial and grant management to serve as primary financial manager on restricted funding; manage sponsored research grants and contracts and financial activity; maintain comprehensive grant records and grant opportunities; process expenditures against budgets; generate reports; and work closely with faculty, supporting international fieldwork projects. The full job opportunity posting and application instructions are posted on the New York University Careers page, posting number 20095091.

NEH Funds Literary Papyri Project

A grant from a joint National Endowment for the Humanities and Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft program will fund the creation of a database of Greek and Latin literary papyri by an international team led by ISAW and the University of Heidelberg.
by Roger Bagnall Jun 03, 2013

A joint program of the National Endowment for the Humanities and the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft has given ISAW and the University of Heidelberg a three-year grant to create a Digital Corpus of Literary Papyri (DCLP), building an infrastructure that initially focuses on Greek and Latin texts but that can accommodate other ancient literatures as well. This resource will be based on the technology used at papyri.info but extend its capabilities to deal with richer description of physical characteristics of papyrus manuscripts, more complex critical apparatus, and other distinctive features of literary papyri. Besides NYU and Heidelberg, the KU Leuven, Duke University, and other partners will contribute to the project, which will be led by ISAW Director Roger Bagnall and Rodney Ast of Heidelberg.

Book on Amheida excavations published

Announcement of publication of a book on the excavations at Amheida written for a general audience.
by Roger Bagnall Jun 03, 2013

Bagnall 2010 Cover PhotoFranz Steiner Verlag (Stuttgart) has published Eine Wüstenstadt. Leben und Kultur in einer ägyptischen Oase im 4. Jahrhundert n. Chr., by ISAW director Roger Bagnall. The book presents the results of the excavations at Amheida, in the Dakhla Oasis of Egypt, that started in 2004 and continue as an ISAW field project. The book results from the Häcker Lectures given at the University of Heidelberg by Bagnall in 2010 and has been updated to include excavations in 2011 and 2012.

The book can be ordered directly from the publisher, or via online booksellers like amazon.de.

Cohn receives grant for research in Paris

Yehudah Cohn has been awarded a senior researcher position under the aegis of the Research in Paris program, and will be hosted by the École Pratique des Hautes Études. He will be working on the Hebrew Pentateuch commentary by Rashi of Troyes (in Northern France).
by Roger Bagnall Jun 21, 2013
ISAW Research Associate Yehudah Cohn has been awarded a senior researcher position from February to July 2014 under the aegis of the Research in Paris program, and will be hosted by the École Pratique des Hautes Études. He will be working on the Hebrew Pentateuch commentary by Rashi of Troyes (in Northern France), of which the Bibliothèque Nationale has numerous manuscripts. Rashi was the pre-eminent Jewish medieval exegete, and while in Paris Yehudah will be investigating the commentary's adaptation of late-Antique sources in Hebrew and Aramaic, originating with the Jews of the Roman and Sassanian empires in the 2nd - 7th centuries.

Job: Development Associate

by Tom Elliott Jul 22, 2013

ISAW is looking for a talented professional who has the ability to work with cross-functional groups to manage the institute's fund-raising efforts and communications. The right candidate has experience with supporting fund-raising at a university or not-for-profit or sales in a for-profit. S/he will create and manage the public face of ISAW through written publications and the website. Please visit
http://www.nyucareers.com/applicants/Central?quickFind=56842 for the full job listing and application procedures.

Amheida Database now Open Access

by Tom Elliott Aug 02, 2013

The database of ISAW’s excavations at Amheida (ancient Trimithis, in Egypt’s Dakhla Oasis), is now open to public use at www.amheida.com. Electronic versions of the volumes of the series Amheida will soon be systematically linked to object and stratigraphic context records, allowing much richer description and photographic documentation to be available to users. Records for unpublished finds are also being made available; all records indicate the status of the material and how it can be used. The Amheida team hopes that in this way the finds at the site can be made available in preliminary fashion before a full analytic publication is prepared, and that scholars working on other sites can find where Amheida might offer relevant comparative material. Annual field reports and links to or scans of publications continue to be available through the project site at www.amheida.org. Additionally, the first volume in the series of final reports Amheida I: Ostraka from Trimithis 1 is also online via the NYU's Ancient World Digital Library.

The Amheida excavations are directed by ISAW’s Leon Levy Director, Roger Bagnall. Paola Davoli (Università del Salento) is the archaeological field director, and Bruno Bazzani is responsible for the database.

Job: Head Librarian

by Tom Elliott Aug 02, 2013

ISAW, in collaboration with the NYU Libraries, is seeking a new Head Librarian for the Institute. The job description and application instructions may be found via the ISAW jobs page.

Job: IT Support Analyst

by Tom Elliott Aug 15, 2013

ISAW is seeking a full-time IT Support Analyst. The job description and application instructions are available via the available staff positions page.

Sabine Huebner's book published by Cambridge University Press

Sabine Huebner's book The Family in Roman Egypt has been published by Cambridge University Press.
by Roger Bagnall Aug 26, 2013

The Family in Roman Egypt: A Comparative Approach to Intergenerational Solidarity and Conflict, by Sabine Huebner, has been published by Cambridge University Press. The book explores such topics as parent-child obligations, residence patterns, adoption, and old age. Part of the work on this book was done during Huebner's year at ISAW as part of the inaugural group of Visiting Research Scholars in 2007-8.

Job: Senior Digital Humanities Web Developer/Architect

by Tom Elliott Aug 27, 2013

ISAW is seeking a full-time Senior Digital Humanities Web Developer/Architect. The job description and application instructions may be reached via the available staff positions page.

ISAW Now Accepting Visiting Research Scholar Applications for 2014-15

by Kathryn Lawson Sep 05, 2013

Each year the Institute for the Study of the Ancient World, New York University, makes about 9 appointments of visiting research scholars. ISAW's scope embraces research and graduate education in the history, archaeology, and culture of the entire Old World from late prehistoric times to the eighth century AD, including Asia and Africa. Projects of a theoretical or comparative nature relevant to this domain are also welcome. Academic visitors at ISAW should be individuals of scholarly distinction or promise in any relevant field of ancient studies who will benefit from the stimulation of working in an environment with colleagues in other disciplines. Applicants with a history of interdisciplinary exchange are particularly welcome. Scholars are expected to be in residence at the Institute during the period for which they are appointed and to take part in the intellectual life of the community.

For details about the categories of scholars, the financial support, and the application, please visit http://isaw.nyu.edu/academics/visiting-scholars. The application deadline is December 2, 2013. New York University is an equal opportunity/affirmative action employer.

Proceedings of Comparative Demonology Conference at ISAW Published

by Kathryn Lawson Nov 13, 2013

The proceedings of the ISAW conference Evil Spirits, Monsters and Benevolent Protectors: Demonology in Ancient Egypt and Mesopotamia, organized by visiting research scholar Rita Lucarelli in 2012, have now been published in Volume 14 (Issue 1, Sept. 2013) of Archiv für Religionsgeschichte. Information can be found at http://www.degruyter.com/view/j/afgs.2013.14.issue-1/issue-files/afgs.2013.14.issue-1.xml

Seventh Leon Levy Lecture Held on November 7

by Kathryn Lawson Dec 04, 2013
Seventh Leon Levy Lecture Held on November 7

Normal L. Peck, Shelby White, Roger S. Bagnall, and Piotr Michalowski. ©NYU Photo Bureau: Sorel

The Seventh Annual Leon Levy Lecture was presented on Thursday, November 7 to a packed room of students, scholars, and the interested public. This marked the first year the annual lecture was supported by a generous endowment grant from The Peter Jay Sharp Foundation, and we were pleased to have the President of the Foundation, Norman L. Peck, in attendance, along with Peter Jay Sharp’s sister, Mary Sharp Cronson and ISAW’s founder, Shelby White. This year's speaker was Piotr Michalowski, the George G. Cameron Professor of Ancient Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor. Prof. Michalowski gave a wonderful talk on Historical Perspective on Sumerian Vistas, which criticized the use of the label ‘Sumerians’ to ancient Mesopotamians during the fourth and third millennia BCE. We thank all those who attended and look forward to seeing you again next year. The 2014 Leon Levy Lecture will be presented by Jessica Rawson, Professor of Chinese Art and Archaeology at the University of Oxford.

The Achelis Foundation Supports ISAW Public Programs

by dd102@nyu.edu Dec 05, 2013

The Achelis Foundation has awarded the Institute for the Study of the Ancient World a generous grant to support our broad range of public programming. This grant enables ISAW to bring in scholars from around the world as well as making possible the year-long series of lectures by our Visiting Research Scholars.  The grant is also providing support for several lectures in connection with ISAW’s Fall and Spring exhibitions.  Not to be missed, Measuring and Mapping Space: Geographic Knowledge in Greco-Roman Antiquity is open through the holidays and closes January 5, 2014.  Masters of Fire: The Copper Age in the Holy Land will be open from February 13, 2014 through June 8, 2014.

In Its Final Weeks: Measuring and Mapping Space

by dd102@nyu.edu Dec 17, 2013

There are only a few more weeks to see the critically acclaimed exhibition Measuring and Mapping Space: Geographic Knowledge in Greco-Roman Antiquity and learn how the Greeks and Romans perceived both the known and unknown worlds. Combining ancient artifacts with Medieval and Renaissance manuscripts that draw upon ancient geographic treatises, Measuring and Mapping Space provides the viewer with the rare opportunity to enter into the both the practical and imagined geographic spaces of the ancient Greeks and Romans.

The exhibition will be closing Sunday, January 5, 2014.  The hours to visit are Tuesday through Sunday from 11 am to 6 pm and Friday from 11 am to 8 pm. It will be closed for Christmas Day (December 25, 2013) and New Years Day (January 1, 2014).

Humanities Initiative Video Features Panel on Measuing and Mapping Space

by dd102@nyu.edu Dec 20, 2013

On December 11, 2013, NYU's Humanities Project highlighted ISAW's current exhibition Measuring and Mapping Space, hosting a panel discussion exploring how ancient societies understood and visualized the world. Panelists included curatorial staff and faculty from ISAW as well as faculty and Ph.D. candidates from New York University and Harvard University. As the exhibition enters its final weeks, videos posted online of this discussion contribute to the experience of walking through the galleries and attending a guided tour.

Videos can be viewed of panelists Roberta Casagrande-Kim, exhibition curator, Alexander Jones, Professor of the History of the Exact Sciences in Antiquity at ISAW, Katharina Piechocki, Assistant Professor of Comparative Literature at Harvard University, and Ademide Adelusi-Adeluyi, Ph.D. Candidate in the Department of History at NYU.

Don't miss the last weeks of the Measuring and Mapping Space: Geographic Knowledge in Greco-Roman Antiquity, closing Sunday, January 5th, 2014.

NY Times Article Features NYU Honorary Degree Recipient Omara Khan Masoudi, Director of the National Museum of Afghanistan

by Kathryn Lawson Jan 15, 2014

Real progress has been made on the mammoth task of restoring the collections of the National Museum of Afghanistan in Kabul that were ransacked by the Taliban in 2001. This recent New York Times article discusses the efforts that have been made and highlights the pivotal role that Omara Khan Masoudi, the director of the museum who was awarded an Honorary Doctorate of Humane Letters by New York University in 2013, and staff played in saving priceless works from destruction. ISAW held a colloquium in honor of Mr. Masoudi on the occasion of his honorary degree.

http://nyti.ms/19nIH3D

New Geographic Data for the Ancient Near East

by Tom Elliott Jan 17, 2014
New Geographic Data for the Ancient Near East

A map of Near East sites in Pleiades

Last week, ISAW and its partners significantly expanded coverage of the ancient Near East in the online Pleiades gazetteer. Using data prepared by the Alexandria Archive Institute (with financial sponsorship from the National Endowment for the Humanities), the Pleiades team updated over 200 records for ancient places and added over 100 new records. The new data includes relevant time periods, bibliography, and geographic locations, as well as 2,500 placenames in languages like Arabic, Turkish, Akkadian, Farsi, Georgian, and more. The places in question were chosen by their importance and frequency of appearance on maps in the Tübinger Atlas des Vorderen Orients (TAVO).  More information about the work, and links to browse the data, are available in a blog post on the Pleiades website.