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You are here: Home > Events > Rostovtzeff Lecture Series: Egyptian versus Greek in Late Antique Egypt: The Struggle of Coptic for an Official Status, II

Rostovtzeff Lecture Series: Egyptian versus Greek in Late Antique Egypt: The Struggle of Coptic for an Official Status, II

Rostovtzeff Lecture Series: Egyptian versus Greek in Late Antique Egypt: The Struggle of Coptic for an Official Status, II

An unedited codex of tablets with Greek and Coptic documents, the most ancient tax receipts in Coptic. Courtesy of Musée du Louvre / Christian Larrieu.

Why Greek was Preferred to Coptic?

Jean-Luc Fournet

Collège de France, Paris

Jean-Luc Fournet is a papyrologist and a specialist in late antiquity. In March 2015, he was appointed professor at the Collège de France (Paris), which created for him its first chair of papyrology named “Written Culture in Late Antiquity and Byzantine Papyrology.” Prior to his current position, he was a scientific member of the Institut Français d’Archéologie Orientale in Cairo (1992-1996), researcher at the CNRS in Strasbourg (1996-2004), and professor at the École Pratique des Hautes Études (Department of Historical and Philological Sciences) in Paris (2004-2015). He devotes much of his scholarly activity toediting new texts, including papyri and Greek inscriptions on late antique amphorae, which he was the first to decipher, and has a special interest in the culture of late antiquity—particularly poetry, multilingualism, and modalities of written culture.

This lecture will outline several possible reasons for the late development of official Coptic. Possible reasons include the nature of the language itself, the prestige enjoyed by the Greek language, the milieu of Coptic’s creation, and the longstanding distrust of the Greek-speaking State towards the legal use of Egyptian.

Registration is required at isaw.nyu.edu/rsvp

The Rostovtzeff Lectures are supported in part by a generous endowment fund given by Roger and Whitney Bagnall.

Admission to lecture closes 10 minutes after scheduled start time.

Please check isaw.nyu.edu for event updates.

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Event Details

  • 03/29/2017
  • 06:00 PM
  • ISAW Lecture Hall
RSVP Required

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