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You are here: Home > Events > Events Archive > Academic Year 2012-2013 > New Questions about Old Gold: In Search of the First Chinese Goldsmiths

New Questions about Old Gold: In Search of the First Chinese Goldsmiths

New Questions about Old Gold: In Search of the First Chinese Goldsmiths

Screen fragment from the tomb of Tian Hong (d. 575 CE), mica with cut gold leaf, Northern Zhou dynasty (557 - 581 CE), Guyuan, Ningxia Province.

Visiting Research Scholar Lecture

Sarah Laursen (ISAW)

Simple wire rings, lightly incised sheets, and foil molded to the contours of more humble materials—these are among the earliest gold remains excavated in China.  Yet it is not until the Warring States period that we begin to see a broader range of techniques (such as granulation, inlay, and gilding) and several centuries later that these items begin to appear with any frequency.  At what point, then, can we say that goldwork was produced locally in China?  In other words, where and when did an independent goldsmithing industry emerge?

This lecture will investigate some of the earliest gold finds in China, as well as the gradual introduction of non-native metalworking techniques into the indigenous repertoire.  Only when we have identified their handiwork will we be able to recognize the first Chinese goldsmiths.

Admission to the ISAW Lecture Hall closes 10 minutes after the scheduled start time.

There will be a reception folowing the event.

This is a public event.

To RSVP, please email isaw@nyu.edu.

Event Details

  • 10/02/2012
  • 08:00 PM
  • 2nd floor Lecture Hall

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