Ishtar Gate Lion, Babylon, Iraq

Reconstructed panel of bricks with a striding lion Neo-Babylonian Period; Processional Way, El-Kasr Mound, Babylon, Iraq; CC0 1.0 Image courtesy of The Metropolitan Museum of Art

CANCELLED: Distant Sources of Babylon's Wealth: Provisioning a City with the Necessary and the Exotic

Exhibition Lecture

Daniel T. Potts

ISAW

Please Note: This event has been CANCELLED. We apologize for any inconvenience.

   

This lecture considers the range of materials that constituted the basis of Babylon's wealth, both the city itself and, more broadly, the entire region, i.e. Babylonia. Locally available resources constituted an important source of wealth, but public display and conspicuous consumption relied upon the importation of a wide variety of goods, including semi-precious stones, precious metals and other exotica. The sources of these materials will be discussed and comparisons will be drawn between Babylon and other urban centers.

D.T. Potts received his AB (1975) and PhD (1980) in Anthropology from Harvard, specializing in Near Eastern archaeology. He taught previously at the Freie Universität Berlin (1981-86), the University of Copenhagen (1980-81, 1986-1991) and the University of Sydney (1991-2012) where he held the Edwin Cuthbert Hall Chair of Middle Eastern Archaeology. His main areas of interest are Iran, Mesopotamia and the Persian Gulf and as a field archaeologist he has conducted excavations in Iran, Saudi Arabia, Turkey and the United Arab Emirates. The founding editor-in-chief of the journal Arabian Archaeology & Epigraphy, he is a Corresponding Member of the German Archaeological Institute and ISMEO (Associazione Internazionale di Studi sul Mediterraneo e l'Oriente). His books include Nomadism in Iran: From antiquity to the modern era (2014), In the Land of the Emirates: The archaeology and history of the UAE (2012); Mesopotamia, Iran and Arabia from the Seleucids to the Sasanians (2010); Excavations at Tepe Yahya, 1967-1975: The third millennium (2001); Ancient Magan: The secrets of Tell Abraq (2001); The Archaeology of Elam (1999, second revised edition 2016); Mesopotamian Civilization: The material foundations (1997); Supplement to the Pre-Islamic Coinage of Eastern Arabia (1994); Further excavations at Tell Abraq: The 1990 season (1991); The Pre-Islamic Coinage of Eastern Arabia (1991); A prehistoric mound in the Emirate of Umm al-Qaiwain: Excavations at Tell Abraq in 1989 (1990); The Arabian Gulf in Antiquity (1990); and Miscellanea Hasaitica (1989). He is the editor of the two-volume Blackwell Companion to the Archaeology of the Ancient Near East (2012) and the Oxford Handbook of Iranian Archaeology (2013).

This talk is given in conjunction with ISAW's exhibition  A Wonder to Behold: Craftsmanship and the Creation of Babylon's Ishtar Gate. This exhibition along with its associated catalogue and programming are made possible by generous support from the Selz Foundation, The Achelis and Bodman Foundation, and the Leon Levy Foundation. Additional funding provided by the Dennis and Diane Bennett Charitable Trust, Elizabeth Bartman, and Karen S. Rubinson.

 

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